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Originally posted by The Seattle Lesbian on April 2, 2018 at http://theseattlelesbian.com/majority-of-lgbt-adults-concerned-about-social-support-and-discrimination-in-long-term-care/ NEW AARP NATIONAL SURVEY FINDS MOST LGBT ADULTS WANT BUT DON’T HAVE ACCESS TO LGBT-SENSITIVE CARE AND SERVICES. When it comes to aging-related concerns, older LGBT adults worry most about having adequate family and other social support to rely on as they age, discrimination in long-term care (LTC) facilities, and access to LGBT-sensitive services for seniors, according to a new AARP survey. Black and Latino LGBT adults report the greatest concern about future family and social supports, and greater worry about potential abuse in LTC facilities because of their race/ethnicity and sexual orientation/gender identity. The survey, “Maintaining Dignity: Understanding and Responding to the Challenges Facing Older LGBT Americans,” found gay men and lesbians have similar concerns about whether they’ll have enough family and/or social support. However, gay men are more likely than lesbians to be single, live alone, and have smaller support systems, which may put them at higher risk for isolation as they age. Transgender adults also report smaller support systems and are at an
Sixty-eight percent of Hispanics had health insurance coverage in 2009 compared to 88 percent of white Americans. Download this fact sheet (pdf) Below are the facts that outline racial and ethnic health care disparities in the United States. The reports “ Easing the Burden: Using Health Care Reform to Address Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care for the Chronically Ill” and “ Measuring the Gaps: Collecting Data to Drive Improvements in Health Care Disparities” outline how robust implementation of provisions in the Affordable Care Act can help address these disparities and ensure that all Americans, regardless of race and ethnicity, get the quality health care services they need when they need them. African Americans or blacks Black or African American refers to people having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa, including those of Caribbean identity. Health coverage Seventy-nine percent of African Americans had health coverage in 2009 compared to 88 percent of white Americans. A total of 16.6 percent of African Americans aged 18 years and over do not have a regular source of health care.

Building Better Mental Health

Posted by Julien Parry on March 6, 2019

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Category: Resources
Your mental health influences how you think, feel, and behave in daily life. It also affects your ability to cope with stress, overcome challenges, build relationships, and recover from life’s setbacks and hardships. Whether you’re looking to cope with a specific mental health problem, handle your emotions better, or simply to feel more positive and energetic, there are plenty of ways to take control of your mental health—starting today. What does it mean to be mentally healthy? Mental health refers to your overall psychological well-being. It encompasses the way you feel about yourself, the quality of your relationships, and your ability to manage your feelings and deal with difficulties. Strong mental health isn’t just the absence of mental health problems. Being mentally or emotionally healthy is much more than being free of depression, anxiety, or other psychological issues. Rather than the absence of mental illness, mental health refers to the presence of positive characteristics. People who are mentally healthy have A sense of contentment A zest for living and the ability to laugh and have

Mental Health Basics

Posted by Julien Parry on March 6, 2019

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Category: Resources
What is mental illness? Mental illnesses are conditions that affect a person’s thinking, feeling, mood or behavior, such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia. Such conditions may be occasional or long-lasting (chronic) and affect someone’s ability to relate to others and function each day. What is mental health? Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make healthy choices.1Mental health is important at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood. Although the terms are often used interchangeably, poor mental health and mental illness are not the same things. A person can experience poor mental health and not be diagnosed with a mental illness. Likewise, a person diagnosed with a mental illness can experience periods of physical, mental, and social well-being. Why is mental health important for overall health? Mental and physical health are equally important components of overall health.  Mental illness, especially depression, increases the risk for many types of physical health

Just how gay is Seattle?

Posted by Julien Parry on March 6, 2019

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Category: Research
This article originally posted October 7, 2012 by Gene Balk at http://blogs.seattletimes.com/fyi-guy/2012/10/07/just-how-gay-is-seattle/ The battle is heating up over Referendum 74, which will ask voters to decide if the new law allowing same-sex marriage in Washington should be upheld.  The people who will be most immediately affected by the outcome of this vote, naturally, are gay men and lesbians. So just how many people would that be here in Washington and in Seattle? It would be nice if there were good, solid data to answer that question, but there really aren’t.   The Census Bureau doesn’t ask about sexual orientation directly.   There are some surveys of the gay population, but the best they can do is approximate an overall figure for the country, not for individual states, counties and cities. However, there is a relevant question that the Census Bureau does ask, and it at least hints at an answer. Since 1990, the Census has asked Americans if they are in a same-sex partner household.   Theoretically, we can assume that there is a correlation between the percentage of same-sex partner households and the

An epidemic of loneliness

Posted by Julien Parry on February 16, 2019

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Category: Research
This article originally posted January 6th, 2019 by The Week Staff at https://theweek.com/articles-amp/815518/epidemic-loneliness Nearly half of all Americans today say they are lonely. Why is that so, and what are the consequences? Here’s everything you need to know: How is loneliness defined? Loneliness isn’t determined by the actual number of friends or social contacts a person has. Social science researchers define loneliness as the emotional state created when people have fewer social contacts and meaningful relationships than they would like — relationships that make them feel known and understood. Essentially, if you feel lonely, you are lonely. One out of two Americans now falls into this category. In a recent study of 20,000 people by the health insurance company Cigna, about 47 percent of respondents reported often feeling alone or left out. Thirteen percent said there were zero people who knew them well. The U.S. is not unique in this respect: Loneliness is reaching epidemic levels throughout the developed world. Forty-one percent of Britons say the TV or a pet is their main source of company,
Originally posted March 1, 2016 by Hari Ziyad at https://everydayfeminism.com/2016/03/difference-between-gay-queer/ For a while, I thought I was gay. And maybe I was for some of that time – there’s nothing wrong with being gay. But I’m definitely not now. I thought I was gay because I thought I was a man, and I thought I was only and always attracted to other men. I don’t know what gender I am anymore, if any. I knew before coming to that particular realization that I’m also not only, and haven’t always been, attracted to men. Additionally, I realized I don’t know what exactly “attraction” means. I know for certain I’m not heterosexual – without a stable gender, I’m not even sure I could be. And when I first began to have these self-revelations, I also knew that I needed space to explore all of these complications. As I spent time figuring out what they meant, I discovered that if I must have an identification that makes sense to others who need to see me with some sort of stability, it would be “queer.” But
Cecelia Hayden Smith, 72, knows exactly how she wants to live out the remainder of her golden years: lounging lazily on the porch of a cozy house tucked along a quiet, treelined street in Washington, D.C. She’d greet her partner each morning with a homemade country breakfast, and their afternoons and evenings would be filled with lively games of Spades and Bid Whist with a dozen or so housemates — all fellow LGBTQ elders. “I’ve already picked out my rocking chair,” the retired substance abuse counselor quipped. “Just call me ‘Mama C,’ and make sure my room is in the front, so I can always see everything going on, and I’m happy.” For now, her dream is in stark contrast of her reality. She and her partner of 30 years, a 78-year-old woman whose names she prefers not to mention, have had health challenges, forcing them to live on a fixed budget in pricey Washington, D.C. They can only afford to live in a crumbling six-bedroom townhome, which they share with three middle-aged and older

HIV and Older Adults

Posted by Julien Parry on February 1, 2019

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Category: Research, Resources
Key Points According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2014, an estimated 45% of Americans living with diagnosed HIV were aged 50 and older. Many HIV risk factors are the same for adults of any age, but older people are less likely to get tested for HIV. Treatment with HIV medicines (called antiretroviral therapy or ART) is recommended for everyone with HIV. Life-long treatment with HIV medicines helps people with HIV live longer, healthier lives. Many older adults have conditions such as heart disease or diabetes that can complicate HIV treatment. Does HIV affect older adults? Yes, anyone—including older adults—can get HIV. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2014, an estimated 45% of Americans living with diagnosed HIV were aged 50 and older. The population of older adults living with HIV is increasing for the following reasons: Many people who received an HIV diagnosis at a younger age are growing older. Life-long treatment with HIV medicines (called antiretroviral therapy or ART) is helping these people live longer, healthier lives. Thousands of older

What men can gain from therapy

Posted by Julien Parry on February 1, 2019

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Category: Resources
Speaking for my gender, there are two qualities that define most men: we seldom like to ask for help, and we do not like to talk about our feelings. Combining the two — asking for help about our feelings — is the ultimate affront to many men’s masculinity. We like to think of ourselves as strong, problem-solver types. But when it comes to emotional and mental issues, men need to quit trying to bottle up their feelings and tough it out, says Dr. Darshan Mehta, medical director of the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. “Your mental health is equally as important as your physical health. Not addressing negative feelings can carry over to all aspects of your life and have a profound impact.” When to see a therapist Depression is the most common reason men should seek professional help. Many life situations — jobs, relationships — can trigger its trademark symptoms, such as prolonged sadness, lack of energy, and a constant feeling of stress. For older men, it can
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